Deadliest Beaches

That’s right, DEADLIEST Beaches. I know that writing posts about “the most beautiful beaches to visit” is probably more of what is expected, but read along, even the deadliest beaches can be a thing of beauty. All depends on how its perceived. When you hear the word beach, you automatically see images of fine white sand, crystal clear blue waters, and the sun shining on a cloudless day. After all, a trip to the beach is meant for relaxing, rejuvenating, and chasing your cares away, right? For instance, there’s a sign at Wright’s Beach, at the southern terminus of the Kortum Trail, warning that this is one of California’s deadliest beaches. All of Sonoma County’s beaches are dangerous, but to first set eyes on, they can be very deceiving. Since the 1930s, 126 drownings have occurred at Wright’s Beach alone. On the upside, beaches can and are meant to be beautiful. But for some, just don’t go into the water.

Here are a few of the most dangerous beaches that could lead you into a false sense of security.

  • Kilauea – Hawaii. …
  • Playa Zipolite – Mexico. …
  • Fraser Island – Australia. …
  • Gansbaai – South Africa. …
  • Volusia County – Florida. …
  • Chowpatty Beach – India. …
  • Bikini Atoll – US Marshall Islands. …
  • Schitovaya Bukhta – Russia

 

But let this article shed a bit of light upon Beaches and the fear that everyone who seeks out the Ocean for fun should have a bit of. These are the beaches you shouldn’t go to if the water is what you seek on your vacations. Take heed!

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/10-of-the-worlds-deadliest-beaches/

http://www.instantworldbooking.com

 


Avoid Internet Scams like Phishing

Want to go phishing?   You’ll only catch some trouble.  Instant World Booking’s fraud department has uncovered some attacks and scams that could cause you some serious trouble, so read on for how to keep your user ids and passwords safe.

A recent “phishing” scam involves a fraudster’s attempt to duplicate a similar-looking webpage to our homepage.  They send emails to clients alerting them to new reservations, and direct them to the scam page to sign in.  Obviously, if you follow their link and enter your password, the fraudster now has it.

Protect yourself.  With any website you use with a user id and password, make sure you’re certain that you are on the correct site.  Here’s how to know.  Look at the address bar at the top of your browser page.  If the page doesn’t start with the precise domain you are trying to access, then don’t sign in.  Many scammers will purchase similar looking domains, but may have additional characters added to fool you. 

To be more certain, use the “secure” version of the website.  Any website that is serious about protecting your security will have a secure server.  So, when you go to the InstantWorldBooking.comhomepage, use the login section at the upper right corner of the page.  Once you click login, you will notice that you are then at https://www.instantworldbooking.com/.  Note the “https” with an “s”.  This signifies that you are now on a secure server.  A little padlock icon on your browser will also indicate the server is secure, and by clicking on the padlock, you will be able to view security information about the secure server.

So, protect your security and personal information.  Always make sure you know what site you are on, before logging in.