The  Southeast Of England

This section is the gateway to Great Britain and is rich in historical interest, romantic and quaint customs. It is also the playground of holiday-makers. The county of Kent is a land of fragrant orchards, of hops and green grass, of moats and of ancient, red brick, timbered houses, a land where arrives gracefully and transforms the countryside into a land of great beauty. Observing the happy character of this land today, one can hardly realize what an apprehensive feeling must have dominated it during the days of 1940 when the hard-pressed British Expeditionary Forces returned to the towns of Ramsgate, Dover, Folkestone, etc.
CANTERBURY is the see of the Primate of All and contains one of the loveliest and most ancient cathedrals in . It was in this that Archbishop a Becket was murdered in 1170 on the steps to the altar. Here rests the body of the Black Prince, hero of the Battle of Poitiers, in his great effigy tomb. Fine examples of mosaic pavements were discovered in the town during the clean-up of the bomb damage caused by reprisal raids during the last war.
Of the many inland places of interest in Kent, TUNBRIDGE WELLS is one of the most famous watering-places in England. Its chalybeate springs have been noted since 1606 and were known to Macaulay, Thackeray and Meredith. Of particular interest here is the Pantiles, a 17th century colonnaded row of . . . . Nearby are two of the most beautiful houses in England: Penhurst Place, the superb 14th century, ancestral home of Lord de LTsle and Dudley; and Knole, an ancient and famous house which covers five acres and is filled with treasures of every kind. Both are open to the public.