The North of England

There is no part of that offers so much contrast, such variety of and interest, as the north of England. In the county of Yorkshire alone one may pass, within the distance of an afternoon’s walk, from flat pastureland where cows stand hock-deep in good grazing to lonely moorland heights where the curlew’s mournful cry echoes among the rocks. Yorkshire is divided into three regions, North, East and West. YORK, one of the most beautiful and historic town: in all England, is situated on the spot where the three Ridings meet. It contains so much to see that the visitor may just as well forget his timetable. An idea of the atmosphere of York may be gained from the fact that the curfew is still running there and has been since William the Conqueror first ordered that fires should be covered at night as a precaution against accident.
The best view of the massive and magnificent Minster is to be had from the walls which encircle the town. The Minster (England’s largest ) was founded before was written, and has existed in its present outward form since the year 1474, where a building program of 250 years was completed. Don’t miss the many quaint side-streets which, in many cases, possess the oddest of names and retain much of their medieval character.